LifeCare Diagnostic Medical Centre

LifeCare Dietitian, Ms Amrita Tan

2 November, 2022

The relationship between diet, lifestyle and risk of Prostate Cancer

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) Globocan 2020 report, prostate cancer is the third commonest cancer among Malaysian males, where 9.3% of new cancer cases among males in 2020 are due to prostate cancer. Based on the Malaysia National Cancer Registry Report 2012-2016, 1 in 94 males is at risk of developing prostate cancer and compared to 2007-2011, increased incidence rates are seen after the age of 55 years old and the highest incidence is in the age group of 70-74 years old.

What increases your risk of prostate cancer?

Some are unmodifiable such as your age, ethnicity and family history. However, adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle can help in reducing your risk of developing prostate cancer.

The few common tips for most types of cancer prevention include maintaining your weight at a healthy BMI range (18.5 – 22.9 kg/m2 based on the WHO Asia Pacific classification), doing regular exercise of at least 150 minutes per week at moderate intensity or 75 minutes per week at a vigorous intensity, and refrain from smoking and heavy drinking.

From the diet and nutrition perspective, make sure to cut down on unhealthy fats such as saturated fats (<10% of total calorie intake) and trans fats (<1% of total calorie intake), at the same time increase healthy fats such as monounsaturated fats (15-20% of total calorie intake) and polyunsaturated fats (5-7% of total calorie intake).

Cut down on unhealthy fats

Meat & poultry
Cheese
Butter
Santan (coconut milk), coconut oil
Palm kernel oil
Stick margarine, shortening, ghee
Pastries, cakes, fast food

Increase on healthy fats

Vegetable oils (e.g. olive, canola, sunflower, peanut)
Mixed nuts (e.g. cashew, peanut, almond, walnut)
Avocado
Fatty fishes
Chia seeds

Cut down on unhealthy fats

Meat & poultry
Cheese
Butter
Santan (coconut milk), coconut oil
Palm kernel oil
Stick margarine, shortening, ghee
Pastries, cakes, fast food

Increase on healthy fats

Vegetable oils (e.g. olive, canola, sunflower, peanut)
Mixed nuts (e.g. cashew, peanut, almond, walnut)
Avocado
Fatty fishes
Chia seeds

Increasing your fruits and vegetables intake
is also vital in reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer.

  • Lycopene, a type of carotene (vitamin A), has been associated with the reduction of prostate cancer risk, which can be mainly found in red-coloured fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes.
  • Cruciferous vegetables (e.g. broccoli) and green tea are also known to have an inhibitory effect on the development of prostate cancer.
  • Besides, consumption of soy products (e.g. tofu, tempeh, soy milk) and legumes appear to show a suppressive effect on prostate cancer progression but more studies are needed to determine its association.

On the other hand, overconsumption of dairy products (e.g. milk, yoghurt, cheese, butter and cream) has been associated with increased incidence risk of prostate cancer from several clinical studies. As dairy products are the main source of calcium, make sure to limit your calcium intake within the daily recommended intake (not greater than 2000 mg per day).

The recommended intake for calcium: 1000 mg per day (1200 mg for women above 50 years old)

Speak to our dietitian if you have any concerns on your dietary needs

Dietitian Amrita

Ms. Amrita Tan Rui Shan

Dietitian

Specialty

Dietetics and Nutrition

Languages

English, Mandarin, Bahasa Malaysia, Hokkien

Qualification

Bachelor of Science (Hons) Dietetics with Nutrition, International Medical University (IMU)

Special interest

Weight Management, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Health, Renal Nutrition, Oncology Nutrition, Geriatric Nutrition, Exercise & Sports Performance

Dietitian Amrita

Ms. Amrita Tan Rui Shan 

Dietitian

Specialty

Dietetics and Nutrition

Languages

English, Mandarin, Bahasa Malaysia, Hokkien

Qualification

Bachelor of Science (Hons) Dietetics with Nutrition, International Medical University (IMU)

Special interest

Weight Management, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Health, Renal Nutrition, Oncology Nutrition, Geriatric Nutrition, Exercise & Sports Performance

It's time to get your prostate assessed.
Don't let the embarrassment delay you from getting early treatment.

Urologist Dr Siva

Dr. Sivaprakasam A/L Sivalingam

Consultant Urologist

Special Interest

Consultant Urologist

Languages

English

Qualification

MB BCh BAO B.MedSci (National University of Ireland), MRCSEd, MSurg (University Malaya)

License Number

MPM 43766, 128256 (Urology)

Medical School

MBBS (Mal) 1980

Membership & Associations

  • Member of Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (MRCSEd)
  • Affiliate member of Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSEng)
  • Post Graduate Training

    Malaysian Urology Board Certification and FRCSUrol (Glas)

    Books Published

  • ‘Renal Cell Cancer’ book chapter in The Year in Urology Vol 3.
  • ‘Andrology’ book chapter in The Year in Urology Vol 2.
  • ‘Prostate Cancer’ book chapter in The Year in Urology Vol 2.
  • Clinic

    Urology

    Urologist Dr Siva

    Dr. Sivaprakasam A/L Sivalingam

    Consultant Urologist

    Special Interest

    Consultant Urologist

    Languages

    English

    Qualification

    MB BCh BAO B.MedSci (National University of Ireland), MRCSEd, MSurg (University Malaya)

    License Number

    MPM 43766, 128256 (Urology)

    Medical School

    MBBS (Mal) 1980

    Membership & Associations

  • Member of Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (MRCSEd)
  • Affiliate member of Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSEng)
  • Post Graduate Training

    Malaysian Urology Board Certification and FRCSUrol (Glas)

    Books Published

  • ‘Renal Cell Cancer’ book chapter in The Year in Urology Vol 3.
  • ‘Andrology’ book chapter in The Year in Urology Vol 2.
  • ‘Prostate Cancer’ book chapter in The Year in Urology Vol 2.
  • Clinic

    Urology

    Designed for general wellness and men’s health, including hormones & reproductive organs..

    RM799

    4. Cut down foods with added sugar

    Foods high in added sugars are typically higher in calories, and frequent consumption may result in weight gain. They are also typically deficient in cancer-fighting nutrients. Tips for reducing added sugars:

    • Choose water, unsweetened tea or coffee.
    • Limit sugary drinks such as sweetened coffee and tea beverages, lemonade, fruit drinks, and pop or soda.
    • Limit foods with added sugars. This includes, sweetened cereals, baked goods, cake, donuts, candy and cookies.

      Again, “moderation is the key.” If you do eat these foods, you may start with smaller portions and gradually reduce the frequency with which you eat them.

    Debunking cancer food myths!

    Can superfoods prevent cancer, including breast cancer?

    Ever heard of people calling blueberries, broccoli, green tea, tomatoes, and other fruits and vegetables ‘superfoods’? This word is used to describe foods that supposedly improve health and prevent diseases like cancer, but this is not backed up by science.

    It’s true that a healthy, balanced diet can help to reduce the risk of cancer, but it is unlikely that any single food will make much of a difference on its own.

    Which of these increases the risk of breast cancer?

    Myth

    - Eggs
    - Burnt food (Acrylamide)
    - Soy / Soy products
    - Sugar (including refined sugar, artificial sweeteners)
    - BPA-lined canned/tinned food

    Conclusion: There is inadequate evidence to say these foods cause breast cancer.

    Fact

    - Red meat
    - Processed meats
    - Alcohol

    Conclusion: Red meat and processed meat are carcinogenic; it means that they could increase the risk of other cancers in general. In addition, the more alcohol you drink, the greater your risk of developing breast cancer.
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