Search
Search
Close this search box.
Mental Health For working adults

Dr Beatrice, Primary Care Doctor

1 July, 2023

Mental Health for Working Adults

In today’s fast-paced and demanding work environments, mental health has become an increasingly important aspect of overall well-being for working adults. The pressures and challenges of the modern workplace can take a toll on mental well-being, impacting productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life. It is crucial to prioritise mental health and create a supportive work culture that promotes psychological well-being, stress management, and work-life balance. By recognising the significance of mental health in the workplace and implementing proactive measures, we can foster a healthier, more resilient workforce, whereby individuals can thrive both professionally and personally.

mental health

What are mental health disorders?

According to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), mental disorders ranges from of anxiety disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, disruptive/dissocial disorders to neurodevelopmental disorders. According to WHO, in 2019, 1 in every 8 people, or 970 million people around the world were living with a mental disorder, with depressive disorders ranking one of the most common.

brains

Who is at risk from developing a mental disorder?

It is therefore no surprise that even the most optimistic character can crumble if exposed to a myriad of pressures (individual, family, community, and structural) simultaneously at any given time. Depression usually happens when the individual’s coping mechanism fails to come through — and those with a background of poverty, violence, disability, and inequality are at higher risk.

Do you face mental health risks in your job?

At work, mental health risks, also known as psychosocial risks, can arise from various factors like job tasks, work hours, workplace environment, and career growth opportunities. Work-related mental health risks include:

Under-utilised or inadequate skills for the job

Heavy workloads, understaffing, and fast-paced environments

Long, inflexible, or unsocial working hours

Lack of control over job design and workload

Unsafe or poor physical working conditions

Negative organizational culture and behaviours

Limited support from colleagues and authoritarian supervision

Violence, harassment, and bullying

Discrimination, exclusion, and unclear job roles

Issues with promotion and job security

Inadequate pay and lack of career development opportunities

Conflicting demands between work and personal life

Do you face mental health risks in your job?

At work, mental health risks, also known as psychosocial risks, can arise from various factors like job tasks, work hours, workplace environment, and career growth opportunities. Work-related mental health risks include:

Under-utilised or inadequate skills for the job

Heavy workloads, understaffing, and fast-paced environments

Long, inflexible, or unsocial working hours

Lack of control over job design and workload

Unsafe or poor physical working conditions

Negative organizational culture and behaviours

Limited support from colleagues and authoritarian supervision

Violence, harassment, and bullying

Discrimination, exclusion, and unclear job roles

Issues with promotion and job security

Inadequate pay and lack of career development opportunities

Conflicting demands between work and personal life

mental health

Common workplace mental health issues

Depression

Depression causes a person to experience:

  • depressed mood (feeling sad, irritable, empty)
  • loss of pleasure or interest in activities
  • for most of the day, nearly every day
  • for at least two weeks or more.
  • Other common symptoms reported include poor concentration, feelings of excessive guilt or low self-worth, hopelessness about the future, disrupted sleep, changes in appetite or weight, and lack of motivation to perform daily tasks.

It is vastly different from the temporary mood fluctuations in response to incoming life challenges.

  • “It’s just a phase.”
  • “You just need to be more positive.”
  • “It is just in your head.”

Here are some common feedbacks received by patients prior to seeking professional psychiatric help due to social discrimination and lack of empathy. Chronic depression when left untreated, can lead to suicide or attempts on suicide.

Is there treatment for depression?

  • Your attending physician might require a comprehensive blood test with thyroid hormone assessment to identify causes or complications from your deteriorating mental health.
  • Occasionally, brain imaging such as CT or MRI is required to exclude organic lesions which can cause altered behavioural changes in patients.
  • Lastly depending on the age and severity, psychotherapy and medication may also be considered.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a common mental health issue in the workplace, often triggered by stress. Different types of anxiety can be observed:

Anxiety often seen at work includes:

Social anxiety:

This can manifest as avoiding social events, difficulty in confronting colleagues, or struggling with interpersonal interactions.

General anxiety:

Employees may experience general anxiety if they frequently worry about their future in the company, constantly stress about deadlines or tasks, or anticipate problems even when none exist.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD):

OCD goes beyond the stereotype of perfectionism. Signs of OCD in an employee may include persistent unwanted thoughts, repetitive reviewing of projects before submission, or difficulties in completing routine tasks.
happy employees

What can be done?

Employers can take proactive steps to support mental health in the workplace. Here are some effective strategies:

  • Provide outlets for employees, such as employee support programs or therapy options.
  • Lead by example, creating a safe environment where discussing mental health is encouraged.
  • Promote mental and physical breaks to help employees recharge and reduce stress.
  • Involve employees in decision-making processes, allowing them to contribute to the larger vision.
  • Personalise rewards to recognize and motivate each employee in a meaningful way.
  • Foster open communication about mental health between employees and management to create a safer and healthier work environment.

Mental disorder does not disappear in a flick of a finger. It is crucial for Malaysians to prioritise mental health and work towards destigmatising mental disorders in our society. The journey towards achieving a mentally healthy nation requires collective efforts from individuals, communities, healthcare professionals, and policymakers. By raising awareness, promoting understanding, and providing accessible and affordable mental health services, we can create an environment that supports and empowers individuals facing mental disorders.

If you find yourself constantly #anxious, stressed, or overwhelmed, know that you're not alone. Seeking help from a qualified #psychiatrist can help you learn coping strategies and take back control of your mental health. Speak to Dr Chee Kok Yoon, Consultant Neuropsychiatrist today.

Clinic Schedule

LifeCare Diagnostic Medical Centre, Bangsar South

Thursday:11:00AM – 5:00PM, Saturday: 10:00AM – 1:00PM

Book your appointment today:

Bangsar South: +6016 226 7680

Email: info@lifecare.com.my

Neuropsychiatrist Dr Chee

Dr. Chee Kok Yoon

朱国运 医生

Consultant Neuropsychiatrist

Specialty

Neuropsychiatry

Languages

English, Bahasa Malaysia, Mandarin, Cantonese

Qualification

MD (USM), MMed (Psych)(UM), Fellowship in Neuropsychiatry (Melbourne)

License Number

MMC No. 35786, NSR No. 131335

Post Graduate Training

Master in Psychological Medicine, UM

Medical School

Universiti Sains Malaysia

Clinic

LifeCare Diagnostic Medical Centre, Bangsar South

Thursday: 8.00am - 5.00pm
Saturday: 8.00am - 1.00pm

Neuropsychiatrist Dr Chee

Dr. Chee Kok Yoon

朱国运 医生

Consultant Neuropsychiatrist

Specialty

Neuropsychiatry

Languages

English, Bahasa Malaysia, Mandarin, Cantonese

Qualification

MD (USM), MMed (Psych)(UM), Fellowship in Neuropsychiatry (Melbourne)

License Number

MMC No. 35786,
NSR No. 131335

Post Graduate Training

Master in Psychological Medicine, UM

Medical School

Universiti Sains Malaysia

Clinic

LifeCare Diagnostic Medical Centre, Bangsar South

Thursday: 8.00am - 5.00pm
Saturday: 8.00am - 1.00pm

  • test

    RM2.00
    Add to cart
  • IBERET FOLIC 500 (30’S)

    RM30.00
    Add to cart
  • SURBEX ZINC 750MG (30’S)

    RM31.00
    Add to cart
0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyView Promotion